dynastylnoire:

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.
How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 
Something’s very wrong with this picture.
What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom


welp

dynastylnoire:

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.

How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 

Something’s very wrong with this picture.

What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

welp

(via godswithinus)

fuckyeahfeminists:

sourcedumal:

illumahottie:

buttahlove:

Big Brother 15 (US)

This was one of the hardest scenes i’ve ever watched on tv, it’s was heartbreaking as fuck to watch two black people resort to tears because they didn’t want to give into the stereotype that follows when a black person gets upset.

Watching her cry and talk about how she’d had enough of white housemates taunt her, call her “Sheniqua” and tell her that she was about to “get black” and flip her mattress off of the box-spring, throw her belongings to the ground, and three of them at the same time bully her until she almost got to the point of getting violent because she’d had enough and felt so threatened. A black man who’d grown up in the south knew better than to leave her in that situation he had to physically pick her up and take her out of the room.

Had to be carried to the Have Not room, a room known basically as the punishment room. A room that most of this season has been dominated by POC and minorities that the rest of the house deemed “unworthy” or just didn’t like to be calmed down. He had to talk her down, telling her that if there was one person in the house he was going out protecting it would be her, his fellow black woman. He’d gladly throw away money to protect her and make sure no one did something to her. He told her he’d give up a bed so she could sleep in it and not have to worry about those girls. She’d said she was tired of this behavior and the comments and why should they have to back down, that they should retaliate, that they shouldn’t be weak.

She was Malcolm X in the situations while he was preaching to her like Martin Luther King Jr.

He said they had to act better than them because all eyes were on them, they had to stay calm. And thats when she broke down and cried and sobbed in his arms, while he was barely able to control his anger towards that side of the house for doing that to her. They both sat their in tears, praying to God to give them the strength to get through the rest of this competition without blowing up.

They had to decide to back down against the enemy instead of give them a taste of their own medicine. They decided to be better than that situation, I applaud them for being so strong.

It was a hard scene to watch and go through as a woman of color. It was a hard fucking scene.

I remember this scene.

I remember I cried with her.

Because white supremacy was goading her and hurting her

And she couldn’t do anything about it

I am so glad that he stood for her

He was 100% in her corner

Because nobody else would be.

heartbreaking.

(Source: dansmist, via bloodonleavesandpaoputrees)

governmentname:

drrexdexter:

We Are Above the Law Declares County Attorney

August 19, 2014 | Paul Craig Roberts

Habersham County, GA: This is the jurisdiction that allowed intentionally, or through negligence, a SWAT team to break into a home with violent force in the middle of the night and throw a stun grenade into a baby’s face, sending him to a hospital for weeks where he was in life support, has ruled that it would be illegal for the county to pay the baby’s medical bills. 

See For Video Report: http://www.wsbtv.com/videos/news/county-will-not-pay-medical-bills-for-toddler-hurt/vCncdf/

The negligence of the police, and thereby the county, is a triple dose. 

It was the wrong house. 

A SWAT team was unnecessary in order to exercise a search warrant for a drug suspect. 

There was no excuse for throwing a stun grenade into a baby’s crib.

But the county attorney has ruled that the county is not liable for these massive incidences of unbridled negligence.

However, the unjustifiable SWAT team assault on the family in the home was legal.

As the saying goes, “a fish rots from the head.” 

The rot in government accountability that began in Washington has now reached the local level.

http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2014/08/19/law-declares-county-attorney/

the fuck is the GBI tho that must supposed to be the FBI

(via blackbayoubengal)

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via blackbayoubengal)

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?August 17, 2014
Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .
Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.
Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.
But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.
Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.
While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.
Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.
After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.
Those never came.
Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.
The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.
In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.
But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.
For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.
After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.
Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.
But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.
Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.
Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.
Source
Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!
Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan NettlesSunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?
August 17, 2014

Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .

Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.

Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.

But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.

Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.

While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.

Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.

After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.

Those never came.

Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.

The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.

In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.

But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.

For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.

After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.

Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.

But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.

Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.

Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.

Source

Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!

Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan Nettles
Sunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.

Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

(via thaeversotalentedmrg)