strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman
1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.
2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”
4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.
5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poems, comic books, and films.
6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events. 

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.
But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman

1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.

2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

Harriet_Tubman_Reward_Notice_1849.jpg

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.

5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poemscomic books, and films.

6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.

But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

(via wrathoftheragingdemon)

ohiohbcu:

Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, has given up more than $90,000 of his salary so university workers earning minimum wage could have their earnings increased to $10.25 an hour.
"My whole thing is I don’t need to work," Burse said. "This is not a hobby, but in terms of the people who do the hard work and heavy lifting, they are at the lower pay scale."
Burse’s annual salary had been set at $349,869. He had been KSU’s president from 1982 to 1989 and later became an executive at General Electric Co. for 17 years, including 10 as a senior executive. He retired in 2012 with good benefits, he said.
Burse started talking with members of the KSU Board of Regents about the gesture more than two weeks before the board met to approve his contract on July 25, he said.
Burse asked how many university employees earn less than $10.25 an hour, an amount some say is a living wage. The current minimum wage is $7.25.
"This is not a publicity stunt," he said. "You don’t give up $90,000 for publicity. I did this for the people. This is something I’ve been thinking about from the very beginning."
The raise in pay for those employees will stay in place even after a new president is selected, he said. It will be the rate for all new hires as well. The change is immediate.
Burse’s salary is now set at $259,745.
Burse replaces Mary Evans Sias, who was president for 10 years. She retired June 30. Burse said he will hold that position for only 12 months while the board seeks a replacement for Sias.
The board asked Burse to do three things, including draw up a strategic plan for the university. To do that, he said, he will conduct a culture survey to find out what staff, faculty and students are thinking.
"A lot of people shy away from culture surveys because they don’t want to know what the people are thinking," he said. "But I need to know am I going in the right direction, and I need to determine where I am going from here."
There have been many changes at the university since he led it in the 1980s.
"People are now more willing and accepting of change," he said. "Before, they had to be convinced of it. It made for heavy lifting, heavier than now. And now there are more areas that need working on, too."
After the board approved the cut in his salary, Burse said, he heard positive comments from people throughout the university, and especially when he walks across campus.
His pay cut is not a poke at other university presidents to follow suit, he said.
"I was in a position where I could do that," he said. "That is not always the case."
SOURCE

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/08/01/3361549/ksu-presidents-gives-up-90000.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/08/01/3361549/ksu-presidents-gives-up-90000.html#storylink=cpy

ohiohbcu:

Raymond Burse, interim president of Kentucky State University, has given up more than $90,000 of his salary so university workers earning minimum wage could have their earnings increased to $10.25 an hour.

"My whole thing is I don’t need to work," Burse said. "This is not a hobby, but in terms of the people who do the hard work and heavy lifting, they are at the lower pay scale."

Burse’s annual salary had been set at $349,869. He had been KSU’s president from 1982 to 1989 and later became an executive at General Electric Co. for 17 years, including 10 as a senior executive. He retired in 2012 with good benefits, he said.

Burse started talking with members of the KSU Board of Regents about the gesture more than two weeks before the board met to approve his contract on July 25, he said.

Burse asked how many university employees earn less than $10.25 an hour, an amount some say is a living wage. The current minimum wage is $7.25.

"This is not a publicity stunt," he said. "You don’t give up $90,000 for publicity. I did this for the people. This is something I’ve been thinking about from the very beginning."

The raise in pay for those employees will stay in place even after a new president is selected, he said. It will be the rate for all new hires as well. The change is immediate.

Burse’s salary is now set at $259,745.

Burse replaces Mary Evans Sias, who was president for 10 years. She retired June 30. Burse said he will hold that position for only 12 months while the board seeks a replacement for Sias.

The board asked Burse to do three things, including draw up a strategic plan for the university. To do that, he said, he will conduct a culture survey to find out what staff, faculty and students are thinking.

"A lot of people shy away from culture surveys because they don’t want to know what the people are thinking," he said. "But I need to know am I going in the right direction, and I need to determine where I am going from here."

There have been many changes at the university since he led it in the 1980s.

"People are now more willing and accepting of change," he said. "Before, they had to be convinced of it. It made for heavy lifting, heavier than now. And now there are more areas that need working on, too."

After the board approved the cut in his salary, Burse said, he heard positive comments from people throughout the university, and especially when he walks across campus.

His pay cut is not a poke at other university presidents to follow suit, he said.

"I was in a position where I could do that," he said. "That is not always the case."

SOURCE

(Source: tontonmichel, via iknowthatsoundsmeanbutwhatever)

th3ic3qu33n:

lookpoorthinkrich:

haramasfuck:

What really saddens me is that this has become so popular. Look past the ignorance of the white man, look past the disrespect and look past the misconception.

This is the true beauty of Afghanistan, my home country.

These are only some examples of the true beauty of Afghanistan. What you see above is simply the result of the western imperialism, western intervention in places that the west has no right to be.

A message to the (mostly US) outside forces “working” to better a country whose destruction is significantly at the hands of those who are “helping” it: get out. 

(Source: pinkmanjesse, via wrathoftheragingdemon)